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Three days into the 21st Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), negotiations are nearing fever pitch as the December 4 deadline for a revised draft text of the Paris climate agreement looms.

Over 130 Heads of State have arrived in Paris in an attempt to sign a new global agreement, amidst high expectations of people all around the world for urgent and meaningful action to respond to the climate crisis. Just over the weekend, the world saw the biggest ever climate marches of almost 1 million people gathering in 175 countries demanding leaders to come to an agreement that is binding, ambitious, durable and just, to replace the Kyoto Protocol and to take effect in 2020. This new climate deal that is yet to be agreed on is quite controversial already in the approach it takes, as it calls on each and every government to say just what and how much it is willing to undertake actions to reduce emissions, provide finance, and adapt to the increasing impacts of climate change.

The 21st Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) opened today in Paris, where the world’s leaders are expected to come to an agreement on actions to solve the climate crisis.

Campaign for Climate Justice Nepal (CCJN), in collaboration with Rural Reconstruction Nepal, South Asia Alliance for Poverty Eradication (SAAPE) and LDC Watch has organised a half-day "Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue on Climate Justice" on 22nd November 2015 in Kathmandu.

The Second meeting of the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on the Sustainable Development Goals (IAEG-SDGs) took place in Bangkok, Thailand, on 26-28th October 2015. Statistics experts from 28 national governments convened with the objective of coming to an agreement on the list of indicators to measure progress for each of the 17 SDGs ratified last September during the United Nations General Assembly.

The Bonn climate change negotiations commenced last October 23, 2015 with a still contentious 33-page draft negotiating text.

Amidst the celebrity hype over the announcement of the United Nations’ Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including Pope Francis’ address of the UN member states, not all who travelled to New York City for the UN Development Summit were buying it.

More than 150 world leaders, hundreds of representatives from Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and corporate executives attended the UN Summit on Sustainable Development from September 25-27 at United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York to formally adopt a new sustainable development agenda.Titled “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, the agreement contains a set of 17 goals and 169 targets that would come into effect on 1 January 2016, replacing the Millennium Development Goals set in 2000.

A day after 193 member states of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, the CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE) together with grassroots activists, faith-based groups and NGOs organized a side event at the margins of the UN summit to discuss pressing issues affecting the marginalized and frontline communities in the context of the post-2015 development agenda.

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