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As the first of three major development conferences this year, the Third International Conference on Financing for Development (FfD3) in Addis Ababa is expected to play a fundamental role in laying the financial groundwork both for the post-2015 development agenda and the climate negotiations. With the current state of negotiations, however, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (Addis Action Agenda) signals a retreat of ambition and is far from upholding Monterrey and Doha, and much less in delivering any adequate response to the needs of the poor and the marginalized.

The much awaited publication of the Pope’s encyclical letter on climate change takes the issue of climate change and social justice further into the public’s consciousness. The Pope aims to influence governments and corporations in time before the 21st Conference of Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) commences negotiations for a global climate deal in Paris on December 2015. It sends a heightened call-to-action, not only for world leaders to adopt a legally binding agreement on greenhouse gas emissions reductions and other urgent climate measures by governments and corporations, but also to billions of people, in their organizations and communities, to stand for climate justice and transformative social change.

The emerging consensus on financing the post-2015 development agenda not only holds up the private sector as the engine of growth and innovation, but also promotes private finance as the fuel of development.

Five years from the next big ‘deadline on climate’, world leaders are still negotiating over deadlines. They are nowhere near agreeing on, much less mobilizing, even a basic roadmap for ensuring the fulfillment of commitments made by northern countries to the global south. This includes bankrolling US $100 billion of climate finance to developing countries every year by 2020, an amount climate scientists estimate is itself barely enough to meet the challenges we face.

Peoples Coalition for Food Sovereignty - Latin America and the Caribbean (PCFS)
Paper contribution for Social PRECOP 2014

In commemoration of the first year of Typhoon Haiyan and to honor all the victims of the global climate crisis, we declare this day, November 8, as International Day for Climate-Affected Communities as we call on all climate-impacted communities and their organizations to unite in demanding justice and system change.

An open letter dated July 17, 2014 has been drafted by several global civil society formations and representatives based in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), expressing sympathy with the people of Gaza and the rest of the Palestinian people, condemning the unjustified attacks by Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) on defenseless civilian communities, and calling on the United Nations and its human rights agencies to take urgent steps to safeguard the Gaza communities and uphold its people’s basic human rights and welfare.

Nearly 180 civil society organizations (CSO) worldwide appealed recently to a United Nations working group to ensure that climate change action be strongly represented among the goals and targets of the post-2015 development framework, also referred to as Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), now being discussed among UN bodies and processes.

The 2nd Intergovernmental Committee of Experts on Sustainable Development Finance was held in New York City last March 3, 2014. In its session, IBON International's representative Paul Quintos delivered his remarks during the event.

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