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Farjana Akter of VOICE (Bangladesh) writes a pithy and passionate piece for urgent climate action, saying that "exercising rights and justice at their maximum standard are the expectations of the people during the climate talks in Doha."

IBON Key Asks at COP-18 states: People of the world are demanding from the world's leaders gathered at COP18 an ambitious, equitable and binding framework to address this planetary emergency.

We are grassroots organizations, labour unions, social movements, non-governmental organizations and other institutions committed to forging new pathways to the future we want – a future where the common good of all takes precedence over the interests of a tiny elite; where the needs and rights of all people are realized; where the environment is not sacrificed to benefit only the few.

Established 68 years ago, the World Bank (WB) remains one of the world’s largest multilateral development finance institutions with 188 member countries. It has a vast personnel consisting of 9,000 employees and consultants spread around the globe in over 100 offices, and an aid portfolio of $57 billion in 2011.

Last August, ADB released its 2012 Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific with a special chapter on Green Urbanization. In this report, ADB exalts Asia-Pacific’s fast-paced urbanization as compared to other world regions. The report says that, in less than a century, 51% of the region has already been urbanized. This commentary, first posted on the Water for the People Network (W4PN) website, shows that the ADB's celebratory tone about urban progress does not, so to speak, hold water.

People’s Coalition on Food Sovereignty (PCFS) champions small-scale fisherfolk's rights to resources and their protection against privatization at the recent 30th session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) held in Rome. (Photo by Jesus Tejel, from Fotopedia.)

International advocacy platform Rights for Sustainability (R4S) joined the “People’s March” on the “Global Day of Action” organized to mark the first day of formal negotiations by heads of states in Rio+20, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, now being held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

As world leaders gather today to discuss a social, economic and environmental roadmap intended to address ecological degradation, they are holding a blueprint for the continued control and commodification of the world’s resources by a few for profits.

The temptation to adopt the MDG-approach to the challenge of sustainable development is easy to appreciate. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have proven useful in sparking public awareness on poverty and other key development concerns, and generating consensus around the goal of addressing them. Against the plethora of social, economic and environmental problems confronting the world’s peoples, it is but rational to identify priorities and focus efforts accordingly.

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